Water Pricing Evaluation at Sam’s club

At Sam’s Club yesterday I was doing an experiment that involved people’s preferences about water. I didn’t set out to do it but I did it after realizing what was happening if you were wondering. What I deduced is that people are willing to pay more for water than they should and are too stupid to realize it.

Unless I’m wrong about this thought, water is water. I’m not sure if there are different levels of water pureness but my overall feeling from drinking thousands of bottles over the course of my life is that bottled water all taste the same . I can’t tell a difference from one producer to the next. With this thought in mind, I want to pay as little as possible for my water. I would think that this thought process would hold true for the masses but I’m wrong because people don’t care about nominal sums of money. Let’s take a look at the following examples and notice the selling/bullet points which all describe the same thing.

Member’s Mark
Let’s start with the smartest option and the buyers choice. 40 bottles for $3.56 equals out to about 9 cents per bottle. This is our benchmark for water.

40 bottles for $3.56 = $.089 per bottle

40 bottles for $3.56 = $.089 per bottle

Nestle
Will you pay 3.5 cents more per bottle for Kosher (aren’t they all?) and a 14 step purification process? 8 less bottles and 42 cents more compared to Member’s.

32 bottles for $3.98 = $.124 cents per bottle

32 bottles for $3.98 = $.124 cents per bottle

Aquafina
I get sticker shock by $4.48. 8 less bottles and 92 more cents compared to Member’s Mark. Why on Earth would you choose Aquafina? The 3 bullet points are sodium, gluten, and fat free.

32 Bottles for $4.48 = $.14 per bottle

32 Bottles for $4.48 = $.14 per bottle

Deer Park
5 less bottles and $1.02 more dollars when compared to our leader. I suppose 100% spring water isn’t a great selling point. This pallet had the most cases on it when I went there.

35 bottles for $4.58 = $.131 per bottle

35 bottles for $4.58 = $.131 per bottle

What I found though after observing the scene is that people don’t even bother to look at the price and compare items that are right next to each other. Obviously we are talking peanuts here and the right decision won’t make or break anyone. I found it fascinating though that people don’t even bother to shop. I believe with a purchase of this magnitude, people justify a small sum of money as something they can afford whether or not it’s the best buying decision. Water experiment closed.